Shelter by the sea


The collective architecture of the plush beach houses on the ECR speaks of a highly-refined taste and class. Prince Frederick takes a trip down the beach to see houses that blend with the sea and the sand

 

 

AS you drive through the many roads that lead you off East Coast Road to the Bay of Bengal, you will notice many a house thumbing its nose at the constructivist, utilitarian, and an almost anti-aesthetic approach that defines urban architecture. Features that repeat themselves with great frequency are meticulously tended gardens, galleries that provide a panoramic view of the sea, balconies that have been corbelled out and balconettes that make the windows stand out. And, all the houses are capped by saddleback roofs with beautifully undulating red tiles, which, interestingly, is the most easily recognisable feature that runs through the ECR. This common aesthetics is in keeping with one of the Coastal Regulation Zone norms that says: “The design and construction of the buildings shall be consistent with the surrounding landscape and the local architectural style.” But whatever uniformity that you find is far from being monotonous. The collective architecture of the plush beach houses on the ECR speaks of a highly-refined taste and class that does not pale on you, no matter how many times you clap eyes on them.

“Beach houses should blend with the sea and the sand,” says Iranian architect Shahriar Dehghan, who has made Chennai his home and the ECR his stomping ground. His creative energies have given shape and style to beach houses that actively respond to their surroundings. “Beach houses should look like they have risen naturally out of the landscape. The building should not deform the natural beauty of the seafront. Be it 1,200 sqft or 10,000 sqft, a garden and a swimming pool are a must in a beach house. Construction of beach houses entails a study of geographical aspects such as climate and wind direction.”

One of the CRZ norms has it that beach houses cannot have more than one floor. Does this restriction stunt creativity? “On the contrary, this norm contributes heavily to the beauty of a beachside neighbourhood. World over, only cities and towns that are free of highrises score high on beauty. Within the city you are constrained to go vertical because of factors such as land prices and non-availability of vacant plots. Along the ECR, you can rise above this restriction. Land prices are relatively low, and those who go for beach houses are invariably people with enough means to purchase quite a chunk of land. Considering all this, where is the need to abandon aesthetics for functionality?”

And aesthetics sells on ECR, even if it comes with a hefty price tag.

“NRIs, expatriates, highly-paid software engineers who work on the parallel Old Mahabalipuram Road and other high income groups are increasingly settling down on ECR. They have the wherewithal to go for forms and structure that are based on Mediterranean or any other European architecture,” says Emmanuel Fernandez of Espana Builders and Developers, who are active on this road.

“Rental business is on an upswing. There are many beach houses that bring in a rent of Rs. 80,000 to one lakh. The demand for rental houses outstrips the supply by a long chalk.”

“With the NRIs showing an interest in ECR, land prices have spiralled. In the last few years, Neelangarai has registered an almost two-fold increase. Not uncommonly, landowners name their price and get it,” says M.M. Ahmed of Mariam and Co.

Norms violation

 As more and more people are bowled over by the charm of living on the ECR, violations are on the rise. It is said that there are quite a number of buildings that fly in the face of the CRZ stipulation that “construction/reconstruction of dwelling units between 200 and 500 metres of the High Tide Level (HTL) is permitted as long as it is within the ambit of traditional rights and customary uses such as existing fishing villages.”

“Thanks to such violations, CMDA notices fly thick and fast,” says Mr. Fernandez.

“As most of those who want to live very close to the sea are generally the rich, it is not much of a problem to them if their piece of property is not approved. They tell themselves `anyway we are not going to apply for building loans,'” says Rozario of Nathan Builders. In point of fact, land within 500 metres of HTL fetches its owner a higher price.

The growth along ECR has not been uniform, but conspicuously haphazard. Says Mr. Dehghan, “Land prices in Neelangarai are higher than they are in Pallavakkam which comes before Neelangarai. But after Neelangarai, land value dips greatly. But when you reach Akkarai, it goes up. The reasons are not far to seek. Neelangarai is a well-planned locality with an excellent layout. The same cannot be said of the other areas. They are characterised by the same shoddy planning that has wrecked Valmiki Nagar.”

Drainage system

 He comes down on the poor drainage system along the ECR. “You do not develop an area by laying roads and then dig them up to lay pipes. It is like putting the cart before the horse. Thorough planning should precede development.”

In many localities along the ECR, water is a sore point. Only bore-level water seems suitable for drinking purposes. And one cannot miss the lack of communion among neighbours. Many feel that they cannot count on their next-door residents for help during an emergency. Probably for this reason, many go for a security cover offered by not less than three dogs. Most of the roads that lead off the ECR culminate in fishermen’s villages. Those living in plush beach houses see in these fisherfolk a ready and willing help during an emergency.

Well, if you count the advantages and the disadvantages of living near the beach, you will in all likelihood find six of one and half a dozen of another. But there is one advantage that tips the scales – peace and quiet. It cannot be gainsaid that beach houses along the ECR provide these in an abundant measure. Longtime residents of Neelangarai, Rukmini Claes and her husband Rene Claes vouch for it.

Source:hindu

What do NRI investors prefer in real estate?


An estimated 30 million non-resident Indians (NRIs) spreadover 140 countries have an estimated combined wealth of USD 1.2 trillion. Expatriates constituted the highest remitters of foreign exchange consecutively for the years 2010 and 2011. Over 6-8 lakh resident Indians leave the country in search of greener pastures and an estimated one lakh NRIs return home every year.

Among the various investment options contemplated back home, real estate plays a key role as the rate of appreciation and periodical returns on investment are more in India . Moreover, a number of NRIs, particularly in West Asia, who cannot continue to stay there due to domicile restrictions will have to return home one day or the other. This is one major reason why they always look at various investment options including real estate back home for permanent settlement.

There are three kinds of investors in real estate – low, middle and high income groups. Within these categories there are end-users as well as investors. In the Association of Gulf Cooperation Council countries (comprising UAE, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Oman, Bahrain and Kuwait), an estimated 55-60 lakh NRIs are working today including semiskilled and unskilled labourers.

Similarly, out of 1.6 million NRIs in Malaysia the preference is more towards southern cities here from where a majority of them come. In Canada, there are NRIs predominantly hailing from Delhi , Chandigarh and other regions . In the US, out of 2.5 million NRIs, southern cities of Bangalore, Chennai and Hyderabad dominate in terms of real estate requirements. The specific real estate needs of NRIs vary depending on the region, savings potential and a combination of other factors. The largest market for affordable housing in the price range of Rs 15-25 lakhs is the Gulf region where there are a large number of expatriates who are either semi-skilled or unskilled, and the salary levels are not too high. There are high net worth individuals and technically-qualified professionals who constitute 10 percent of the NRI population. Many of this segment are looking for apartments in the price range of Rs 50 lakhs to Rs 1 crore and villas in the price range of Rs 1.5 crores plus. There are also others keen on investing in commercial property .

According to banks in the Gulf, the average home loan size is Rs 30-70 lakhs and the predominant demand revolves around apartments. The overall home loan business in Dubai alone ranges from Rs 720-800 crores.

Among the cities that drive real estate demand overseas are Bangalore, Chennai, Jaipur, Kochi, Mumbai, NCR, Pune and some other smaller cities. Even some Tier II cities are in demand. A majority of the NRI buyers are end-users . There are buyers looking for a second home for use by their family members, to earn periodical returns on the investment , or even to retain as a buffer to meet contingencies.

Investing in land is quite popular among NRIs too as those who cannot buy an apartment immediately are keen to invest in a lesser value asset. Land value appreciates fast.
With the relocation of more skilled professionals to developed countries such as UK, USA, Japan, and Australia, there is a growing requirement of apartments in the price range of Rs 70 lakhs plus in metros. Villa developments are sought-after especially in the price range of Rs 1.50-Rs 2.50 crores.

A significant factor is that these days many high net worth individuals prefer income-yielding assets such as leased commercial property or opt for pre-launch offers which yield 18-25 percent during the project implementation stage. A section of NRIs are also keen on investing in project level entities on non-repatriation basis by forming a partnership firm or incorporating private limited companies.

———————————————————————————————————————————————————————-

Homes at Marg swarnabhoomi,aayush,utsav,maha utsav,navratna,four seasons,apartments,flats for sale,chennai flats,flat for sale in chennai

Homes at Marg swarnabhoomi

———————————————————————————————————————————————————————-

Source:The Economic Times

Buying a Property In India: A Dream Come True For NRIs


Buying a home in India is one of the ways to feel connected to the native land for the Non-Resident Indians (NRI). Possessing a home in any corner of the world is a way to secure the financial status and the future in the scenario of global recession and uncertainty of the financial position. The rules for buying, making transaction, for the grant of the loan and its repayment, every thing is governed by the regulations of Reserve Bank of India (RBI) and the Foreign Exchange Management Act (FEMA). Those NRIs who are looking forward to own a dream house in India first need to know in detail about the real estate scenario at the time of purchasing and the procedures for buying the property:

  • NRIs are free to buy any property in India other than the agricultural land and plantation property.
  • The payment for the properties can be done either from the funds held in the non-resident accounts or that which are received by internal remittance. It is to be noted that traveler’s cheque and foreign currency notes are not accepted for property transactions.
  • Loan facility is available to the NRIs for the purchase of the property and also for the renovation. The rules for the loan are as per the regulations of FEMA (Foreign Exchange Management Act). The basic rule is that the banks can not renew the existing loan or grant a fresh loan when the loan amount exceeds the number of 1 crore against NRE and FCNR deposits.
  • The loan can be repaid through normal banking channel, rental income from the purchased property, cheque from the bank account of the local relatives and also by making debit to the account of NRE/ FCNR/ NRO.

Those who have detailed knowledge of the property scenario in India are less likely to commit mistake at the time of purchasing a home here. It is better to take the advice of the professionals and experts in eth field before finally making any decision.

============================================================================================

lake view garden plots,swarnabhoomi cityscapes,marg swarnabhoomi,vill aplots,ecr plots,plots in chennai

 

 

============================================================================================ Source:http://blogs.realestateindia.com/2012/04/23/buying-a-property-in-india-a-dream-come-true-for-nris/

For stability, NRIs turn towards realty


Recently an acquaintance, a fund manager by profession, relocated to India to set-up a domestic private equity fund. He had invested in a Mumbai residential property strategically located close to the primary business district and an international school. This investment, done a few years back, helped him crystallise his plans for relocation to India and start his venture without spending time in finding the right location, house and school.

What I found most interesting was that he had not even considered eventually relocating to India when he bought this apartment. He had simply done it for investment five years previously.

The Way Of The NRI

To date, I have not met a single NRI who is not keen to buy real estate in India. Home ownership in this country is one of the most satisfying means available to them to stay connected to their motherland. Very often, such investments in their country of origin help them to maintain their relationships back home while they seek their fortune abroad.

Another NRI businessman based in Europe and now relocating to NCR on the heels of the Euro crisis, was seeking to build a local business base here. Achieving this while resettling family on all fronts has not been an easy task for him. He is on the lookout for the ‘best’ location for a residential property in NCR and naturally finds the cost of properties in the prime areas staggering and beyond belief.

He had not considered investing in a property earlier. Completely out of sync with the market dynamics back home, he blithely assumed that his foreign-earned savings would make finding a luxurious home a breeze. He was ill prepared for the astronomical ticket sizes that now prevail.

Over the past few years, we have noted that NRIs are investing in residential real estate specifically in large Indian cities to build a back-up base in the country. This particularly applies to NRIs with professional/entrepreneurial ambitions who intend to set up businesses in these cities in the future.

After the 2008-09 global financial crisis, India has stood out as a showcase example of financial stability, specifically in terms of its conservative banking sector. More than anything else in the past, the crisis caused NRIs to seriously contemplate owning homes in India as their rattled confidence in all things foreign gave way to a yearning for familiarity and stability on both on the personal and professional fronts.

Rules Of Engagement

NRIs have no restrictions limiting them with regards to how many commercial or residential properties they can own in India. However, there are restrictions on the repatriation of sale proceeds, which is limited to two units. Effectively, this means that NRI face no restriction while investing into commercial or residential real estate in India. However, when a NRI decides to sell and take the money back to the country of residence, he can do so with the sale proceeds of only two units.

NRIs can invest into real estate by remitting funds to India through normal banking channels, or by invest through funds in NRE/FCNR/NRO accounts maintained in India. They cannot make payment via traveller’s cheque or foreign currency notes. They are also restricted from making any payments outside India or settling payments through exchange of funds outside the country.

NRIs can avail home loans from institutions approved by the National Housing Bank, and loan repayment can be done either through inward remittances, debit to NRE/FCNR/NRO account, via rental income earned in India or by borrowing from close relatives residing in India. NRIs can also avail of home loans from the employer in India, provided specific terms and conditions listed by RBI are met.

NRIs can mortgage residential property in India with a financial institution without any approval from RBI and a foreign financial institution with prior approval from RBI.

NRIs can rent out their property without the approval of the RBI. Rent received can be credited to NRO/NRE account or remitted abroad. Authorised dealers have been empowered to allow repatriation of current income like rent, dividend, pension, interest, etc. of NRIs/PIOs who do not maintain an NRO account in India, based on appropriate certification by a chartered accountant confirming that the funds proposed are eligible for remittance and that applicable taxes have been paid or provided for.

No one can exactly predict the fate of any currency, or the stability of any economy. Economies are notoriously ‘subject to market risk’ — for instance, no one had expected that west Asia would see political uncertainty a few years back. However, when it comes to personal and career stability, there must be no margin for error. The current trends suggest that more NRIs are taking important decisions with regard to owning residential real estate in India as a bulwark against uncertain times.

Source:http://www.financialexpress.com/news/for-stability-nris-turn-towards-realty/953968/0

What do NRI investors prefer in real estate?


An estimated 30 million non-resident Indians (NRIs) spreadover 140 countries have an estimated combined wealth of USD 1.2 trillion. Expatriates constituted the highest remitters of foreign exchange consecutively for the years 2010 and 2011. Over 6-8 lakh resident Indians leave the country in search of greener pastures and an estimated one lakh NRIs return home every year.

Among the various investment options contemplated back home, real estate plays a key role as the rate of appreciation and periodical returns on investment are more in India . Moreover, a number of NRIs, particularly in West Asia, who cannot continue to stay there due to domicile restrictions will have to return home one day or the other. This is one major reason why they always look at various investment options including real estate back home for permanent settlement.

There are three kinds of investors in real estate – low, middle and high income groups. Within these categories there are end-users as well as investors. In the Association of Gulf Cooperation Council countries (comprising UAE, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Oman, Bahrain and Kuwait), an estimated 55-60 lakh NRIs are working today including semiskilled and unskilled labourers.

Similarly, out of 1.6 million NRIs in Malaysia the preference is more towards southern cities here from where a majority of them come. In Canada, there are NRIs predominantly hailing from Delhi , Chandigarh and other regions . In the US, out of 2.5 million NRIs, southern cities of Bangalore, Chennai and Hyderabad dominate in terms of real estate requirements. The specific real estate needs of NRIs vary depending on the region, savings potential and a combination of other factors. The largest market for affordable housing in the price range of Rs 15-25 lakhs is the Gulf region where there are a large number of expatriates who are either semi-skilled or unskilled, and the salary levels are not too high. There are high net worth individuals and technically-qualified professionals who constitute 10 percent of the NRI population. Many of this segment are looking for apartments in the price range of Rs 50 lakhs to Rs 1 crore and villas in the price range of Rs 1.5 crores plus. There are also others keen on investing in commercial property .

According to banks in the Gulf, the average home loan size is Rs 30-70 lakhs and the predominant demand revolves around apartments. The overall home loan business in Dubai alone ranges from Rs 720-800 crores.

Among the cities that drive real estate demand overseas are Bangalore, Chennai, Jaipur, Kochi, Mumbai, NCR, Pune and some other smaller cities. Even some Tier II cities are in demand. A majority of the NRI buyers are end-users . There are buyers looking for a second home for use by their family members, to earn periodical returns on the investment , or even to retain as a buffer to meet contingencies.

Investing in land is quite popular among NRIs too as those who cannot buy an apartment immediately are keen to invest in a lesser value asset. Land value appreciates fast.
With the relocation of more skilled professionals to developed countries such as UK, USA, Japan, and Australia, there is a growing requirement of apartments in the price range of Rs 70 lakhs plus in metros. Villa developments are sought-after especially in the price range of Rs 1.50-Rs 2.50 crores.

A significant factor is that these days many high net worth individuals prefer income-yielding assets such as leased commercial property or opt for pre-launch offers which yield 18-25 percent during the project implementation stage. A section of NRIs are also keen on investing in project level entities on non-repatriation basis by forming a partnership firm or incorporating private limited companies.

source:http://articles.economictimes.indiatimes.com/2012-05-26/news/31860951_1_nris-real-estate-price-range

Weak rupee makes real estate investments cheaper for NRIs


he depreciating rupee has positively influenced the demand from NRIs for residential properties in various cities across India, especially in Mumbai. The rupee has been touching new lows everyday. Even today, the rupee touched 54.82 per dollar in early trades. Exporters and the NRIs are two categories which stands to gain from the weak currency, as they will receive more rupee funds on conversion. The term NRI also includes Persons of Indian Origin (PIOs) and Overseas Citizens of India (OCIs).

“Because of the rupee’s downward trend, real estate has become cheaper for NRIs and many of them are now actively seeking residential property investment opportunities in the financial capital,” says Om Ahuja, CEO – Residential Services, Jones Lang LaSalle India “Apart from the advantages they have due to the depreciating rupee, developers are more than willing to offer discounts today owing to their ongoing liquidity concerns,” says Om Ahuja.

ADVERTISEMENT:

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

MARG Swarnabhoomi, christened as “The Land of New Thinking”, is the campus of education, research, innovation, industry and living.

homes,marg swarnabhoomi

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

Should you invest?

Investing in real estate makes sense only if you plan to return to India eventually. And when it comes to finalising the investment, focus on the current price and the potential value of the property in a particular city or a suburb. Here is a quick check list.

1) Reputed builder

“You have opt for a familiar and reputed builder as there is greater chance that projects of reputed builders will appreciate more than the others,” says Jayant Pai, CFP, Vice-President Parag Parikh Financial Advisory Services.

2) Location

The scope for capital appreciation will be much higher in suburbs where you expect infrastructure development. That way you can enter at a lower price level and make optimum gains. “Ideally the locations should witness some big infrastructure development such as launch of new commercial spaces, airport, IT parks etc. These developments have the potential to earn a good return on your real estate investment,” says Om Ahuja.

This can be underscored from that fact that in Chennai, properties along OMR road are fetching good values because of its proximity to several IT companies. “If you buy a house in such locations, there is scope to see good capital appreciation and also you stand a good chance to get a personal or corporate lease on such properties,” says Om Ahuja.

3) Invest in individual houses or apartments

“NRIs are not permitted to purchase plots of land/plantations/farm houses and even commercial real estate is subject to a plethora of limiting regulations, purchasing apartments or bungalows may be the only options available,” says Jayant Pai.

4) Document Check

The most important document required is the sale/purchase deed. Sale deed will confirm the land is on the seller’s name who has the only right to sell the land. You need a copy of previous deeds if you have also bought it as a resale property. You also need original copies of Stamp duty and registered house documents. In case of a joint ownership, the owner/owners have to submit documented consent from the joint owners.

5) Avoid short-term investment

Ideally an investor should look at a time horizon of 5-7 years to compute actual gains, experts say. “However, real estate investments in the near term can get tricky since it is an interest rate sensitive sector. The demand may be impacted by relatively high interest rates,” says Vishal Kapoor Head, Wealth Management,Standard Chartered Bank, India.

Source:http://articles.economictimes.indiatimes.com/2012-05-21/news/31765459_1_nris-weak-rupee-overseas-citizens

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

ADVERTISEMENT:

Swarnabhoomi Cityscapes : Villa plots starting from 4.99lakhs.

Launching villa plots on East Coast Road (ECR), Chennai

swarnabhoomi cityscapes,lake view garden plots,bay view villa plots,royal orchard plots,marg swarnabhoomi

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

A check list for NRIs buying a house in India


Investment from any source in the housing sector is an appreciated aspect in today’s Indian real estate scenario, from an industry perspective. Let it be resident Indians, NRIs or even companies, constructing houses creates jobs for a lot of people. A back-of-the-napkin calculation shows that for a 1000 sq feet house, 100 direct employment opportunities (architect, building engineer, masons, helpers, electricians, plumbers, painters, carpenters, etc)  and over 1000 indirect employment opportunities (people working in cement plant, brick kilns, tiles kilns, electrical fittings companies, saw mills, steel plants, paint companies, etc) are created. Of course the duration of the employment will depend on a number of factors like nearness to a supply sources for material and labour, access to high tech equipment, architecture, etc.
But to construct a house is not all that easy. It is not without substance that a Tamil saying goes, “Veetai Katti Par, Kalyanathai Panni Par” (Basically the saying rates constructing a house and having a child’s marriage done among the toughest).

NRI’s Woes
To an already difficult task, the sheer distance and absence during construction become problems that multiply, for the NRIs. There was an NRI based out of the USA who got a wonderful sales pitch from a builder. The salesman met the NRI at his office in the USA and arranged for all the documentation and also sent video clippings of the apartment at Bangalore. Convinced on the genuineness, the NRI transferred Rs.50 lakhs to the builder’s account. The date for the house warming was fixed after one month. The NRI could not make it to the function due to some pressing work and had asked his parents to do the poojas.
The parents got the shock of their life, when they landed at the apartment complex the day before the poojas. The complex had only one sample apartment finished (the one in the video). They were told by the Project Manager at the site that the poojas can be done at anytime but the apartment can be delivered only after “6 months”.
Another NRI who was building the house himself using an experienced and well referenced engineer found that his house orientation has been shifted by 15 feet. This left him space on the wrong side of the house squashing his plans to build a small commercial complex in future.  They now have space for parking 4 cars but none for building a rent-worthy space.

Is There a Way Out?

A number of checks could have been used to be on the safer side in both the above cases:
1.    There are a number of professional builders who are a lot more trustworthy. So doing a bit of research on the track record of a builder can help.
2.    For any real estate purchase it is preferable to make visits to the sites before buying them. This exercise is worth it not only because you are committing a large amount of money but also because reversing the decision proves costly as well. If an NRI is not able to make it, he can request a trusted friend or relative to opt for the site visit.
3.    Going for a housing loan through a bank will ensure that the money is released in stages only. This keeps the money safe during the construction. Also, all the banks at their local branches, have their list of shortlisted builders for whose constructions loans are pre-approved. It is better to buy only these constructions, as the banks are quite stringent in their norms for pre-approval and shortlist only those builders who have a proven track record and those projects, which comply with all legal norms.
4.    Post the construction, the management of the asset is one of the major issues faced by NRIs. There is no easy solution for this. There are some society associations which support the owners of the buildings with services like maintenance and rent collection. There are again the “friendly neighborhood real estate agents” who may sometimes double up as the maintenance manager too. There are a few professional real estate management firms in most metros, who are now expanding into the 2nd Tier cities too.
5.    Some of the other checks for any real estate purchase are:
a.    Whether the construction rate quoted is for Built-up area or Carpet area? Construction is generally quoted for built-up area and rental is quoted only for the carpet area. There can be a difference of 15 % to 20% between the two based on the type of construction. Today in apartments there is the concept of super built-up area which apart from the built-up area includes stair case, common passages, fire escape passage, etc. The super built-up area can be bloated by as much as 50% of the carpet area.
b.    Robert Allen, the Real Estate Mogul suggests the 100 – 20 – 10 – 1 rule for any real estatepurchase. The idea is to check out 100 properties in person; shortlist 20 of them for a deeper scrutiny; enter into negotiation with sellers for 10 of the properties and finally buy the ONE that is best suited .
c.    Technically there should be a check for all the statutory approvals – town planning (Nobody wants a flyover at arms length from the balcony!), water supply and sewage disposal, safety approval from the local fire department, etc. It is always better to ask for the encumbrance certificate and the title deed from the builder to get a legal opinion from a lawyer.
6.    Don’t hesitate to ask. This is probably the most important point. Many times, for avoiding being thought of as less intelligent, we question less. For any investing and particularly for real estate the more the questions asked the better the investment. The genuineness of the promoter can be gauged by the patience, the promptness and depth of the answers. Answers like, “Don’t worry about that, we will manage”, without going into the specifics are danger signs.
7.    Take time. Do not restrain yourself by limiting the time for checking the properties and decision making to the time that you are present in India. A 2 to 4 week holiday cannot be hoped to be converted into a real estate investment period. Start the process before you come here. In case you cannot decide before you leave, it is okay. A Power of Attorney to a parent or a relative can be used to decide on the actual purchase even after you India.

source:http://in.news.yahoo.com/a-check-list-for-nris-buying-a-house-in-india.html